Discerning Which Video Game Genre Utilized as a Therapeutic Tool for Treating Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease is the Most Effective

Hayduke, David (2010) Discerning Which Video Game Genre Utilized as a Therapeutic Tool for Treating Patients with Alzheimer’s Disease is the Most Effective. [Abstract]

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Abstract

While video games have been studied with much negative scrutiny for years, it has actually been proven to have positive effects on patients suffering from Alzheimer’s disease. However, due to the nature of the studies it has been difficult to suggest why it is so helpful. To fully understand why it does help patients regain some cognitive functionality I am proposing a study that examines how exposure to 10 hours of game play a week for five genres of video games (action-FPS, action-platformer, strategy, RPG, and puzzle) will help patients perform on a set of four cognitive tests (memory, reasoning, visuospatial skills, and motor response skills). According to the research it appears that the strategy group will perform the best overall on the four cognitive skills with other certain groups performing individually better in a specific cognitive task.

Item Type: Abstract
Created by Student or Faculty: Student
Additional Information: 5th Annual Natural & Behavioral Sciences Undergraduate Research Symposium Program
Uncontrolled Keywords: Video Game, Computer Games, Gaming, Electronic Games, Alzheimer's Disease, Computer Software, Older People -- Diseases, Computer Programming, Cognition, Psychology, Cognitive Ability, Cognitive Training, Self-efficacy, Computer Training,
Subjects: NBS Symposium
Interdisciplinary > Pre-Health
School of Natural and Behavioral Sciences > Psychology
School of Natural and Behavioral Sciences > Public Health
Depositing User: Alejandro Marquez
Date Deposited: 26 Jun 2013 08:55
Last Modified: 26 Jun 2013 08:55
URI: http://eprints.fortlewis.edu/id/eprint/399


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