Art of Another Kind​: Understanding the Process and Relevance of Informalism

Harris, Jason (2015) Art of Another Kind​: Understanding the Process and Relevance of Informalism. [Abstract]

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Abstract

As a visual artist, the primary function of my work is to explore sensuality and how human beings experience existence through our senses. Inspiration for my work comes from many sources and I am constantly struck by the connections in thought between other artists of varying disciplines. This is what led me to Informalism. The purpose of this research project was to discover the relevance and accessibility of Informalist art in a contemporary cultural context, namely that of an Indigenous individual with formal art training. By examining the relevance of such, I hoped to find a valid connection between my work, the cultural context it is created in, and that of Informalist painters of the 1950’s-60’s. Informalism is relevant to my art because all art created under the title eludes to a greater understanding of human suffering and the nature of existence. Being Native American, I can attest to the feelings of despair prevalent in my people. I see the deep connections between other cultures seeking to find a universal aesthetic to express this sentiment. My research found that Informalism is relevant today because it is based on aesthetic principles deeply rooted in cultural identity and social reform. However, Informalism’s accessibility is limited when attempted by individuals with formal training as it requires spontaneity and honesty derived from automatism.

Item Type: Abstract
Created by Student or Faculty: Student
Uncontrolled Keywords: informalism, abstracts
Subjects: Undergrad Research Symposium > Art and Design
Undergrad Research Symposium
Depositing User: Jason Harris
Date Deposited: 14 Apr 2015 20:55
Last Modified: 15 Apr 2015 08:57
URI: http://fortworks.fortlewis.edu/id/eprint/696


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